Lesson 1: Big Brother Is Watching You
  • Standard
    • Media Literacy 3.C.3 - Recognize that creators of media use a number of forms, techniques, and technologies to convey their messages.

  • Expectations
    • My group will be able to show their interpretations of the novel.
    • They will be able to materialize what they see Big Brother as.
    • They will show their understanding of the Pages, Photoshop, Word, or any other visual program

  • Materials
    • laptop with Pages or other visual software.
    • The Internet
    • Instructions

  • Opening
    • I will show my group different interpretations of Big Brother that are found in the movie and in the Apple commercial.
    • We will discuss what makes these faces "Big Brother Worth" and what qualities they have.

  • Middle
    • The group will search for a few different faces on Google Images and label their attributes that make them look like "Big Brother".
    • They will use their computer to attach captions or labels to show what a "Big Brother" needs.
    • They can use other "Big Brother"-esque figures throughout history.

  • Ending
    • The group will share their pictures and we will discuss any real-life Big Brothers that they used.
external image 1984bb.jpgexternal image 21352c110.jpgexternal image apple_big_brother_1984.png
Lesson 2: The Ministry of Love
  • Standard
    • Standard 3.F.1.- Use knowledge of word origins and word relationships, as well as historical and literary context clues, to determine the meanings of specialized vocabulary.

  • Expectations
    • My group will be able to relate the novel to real life.
    • They will be able to find links between the novel and real life.
    • They will learn that anything can be seen as good or bad.

  • Materials
    • laptop with Microsoft word.
    • The Internet (Google Images)
    • Instructions

  • Opening
    • I will describe words or places from the book to my group members that are near oxymoronic, such as the Ministry of Love.
    • We will discuss why these things are named the way they are in the novel, because it makes it more palatable.
    • We will talk about a few real life versions of this such as 'the big doll house'.

  • Middle
    • The group will choose find three of the five images of the phrases 'rebel', 'police', 'brother', 'prison' and 'school'. They will find two images each, one of each extreme - seen as perfect and happy, and seen as sad and miserable.

  • Ending
    • The group will share their pictures and we will discuss how anything can be portrayed as good or evil.



Lesson 3: Rebellions
  • Standard
    • __
STANDARD 3.5.1 (Viewing and media literacy) All students will access, view, evaluate, and respond to print, nonprint, and electronic texts and resources.
    • __

  • Expectations
    • My group will be able to relate the novel to the movie 'Fight Club'.
    • They will be able to find the difference between a successful rebellion and a failed one.
    • They will discover the flaws of Winston's rebellion as compared to the pros of Tyler Durden's rebellion.

  • Materials
    • My Laptop
    • Fight Club DVD
    • Instructions

  • Opening
    • We will first watch a short scene from Fight Club of Pitt's character talking about what he wants from his rebellion.
    • We will discuss the reasons that he wanted these things and compare them to Winston's reasons to rebel.
    • We will also discuss how they rebelled.

  • Middle
    • The group will present pros and cons of the two's rebellions, such as the society they rebelled in, and how it effected the outcome of the rebellion.
    • We will discuss how all of these things played into the outcome of the movie/novel.
    • The group members will find another movie/novel that had a rebellion and discuss the pros and cons of that rebellion. What made it easy, difficult, etc.

  • Ending
    • We will watch the scene in Fight Club where Tyler completes what he wanted to complete.
    • We will talk about how in 1984, the society was very far from being able to rebel successfully.


external image AP

INTERVIEW

He wasn't war weary or traveled, having never even left the United States. He was clean cut, wearing a black polo and pressed khakis- it was casual Friday. He was sitting at his kitchen counter smiling and offering me something to drink. The bright room was stuffed with Superman memorabilia: clocks, refrigerator magnets, and
Television and radio were the main informants during the War.
Television and radio were the main informants during the War.
mugs. The Vietnam War was not on his mind, it had not been for a long time.
"I only cared a little at first", said David Sandusky nonchalantly. He was never a part of the draft or the crowds protesting the draft, but the war did effect him very much. His older brother was theatened by the thought of being drafted ; he was 19 when the draft was instated. David associates the draft with one event consisting of "a lot of cursing". When his mother saw news of the draft on the television , all she could do was scream profanity under her breath. She muttered it up the stairs and into David and his brother Peter's room, where she and Peter both reacted with astonishment. David stared me right in the eye, he remembered it vividly.
"[The draft] put everything into perspective, but it also made everything a little risky". Every action was in question, especially for his brother. Peter seemed to care less and less about school, saying "I'm only going to be drafted" and flaunting a 'who cares' attitude. He claimed that he would run away to Canada if he was ever drafted.

Nervously, David tapped his fingers on his mug. "My friends and I all hated the war ". But they soon hated it even more. Two years after the start of the draft, his friend James had been drafted. His friends and he reacted with disbelief to the draft letter. James was the first and only person that David was close to that was drafted. The draft seemed to make everyone care less about their home lives, but when finally drafted, James went out of sync. James, the straightedge kid, started drinking. The war even effected his thoughts and feelings; James was either fully in the moment- making the most of his final days in the states- or completely gone, with the war being the only thing on his mind.
Young American In Vietnam
Young American In Vietnam

When James was 19 he was drafted, near the end of the war. He was a clean cut kid in a dirty world. James sent David letters and David even read the letters James sent to his family. He would always talk about exhaustion, training, and boot camp. But, sometimes he would talk about the jungle and its beauty. He would describe the view of it from a helicopter and the different flora and the vibrant greens. He was only in Vietnam for about three months, but in that time he also saw his fair share of death and sadness.
David was mopey when he talked about his friend in Vietnam. He starred at the table, he sighed a lot, and his face was unchanging. His mannerisms changed once he finished his story. He looked up at me and smiled. "What else do you have for me?" He looked back down as the question "how did he change" surfaced.
"He started smoking ". David looked back to his mug. "He was morally opposed [it]" before the war. James was still the same person except he cared less and jumped whenever he heard a loud noise. He went to college in Washington DC for a few years and then back to Rockland, their homeotwn, for a year or so. James moved around for a while until he come to Florida, where he currently resides.
Though not on the frontlines, David lived through the war at home. He carries his experiences everywhere he goes. He does not put them on display for everybody to see, but he still thinks about James and the war. "He could be anywhere now" said David about James. They have grown apart since the war and now live completely different lives. "There's no such thing as a good draft, just like there's no such thing as a good war."


Video


CBS News November 1969 Draft Lottery


How many future soldiers discovered that they were drafted