Interview


As I walked into Jochevet Knopp humble Washington Township headquarters, I was greeted with a big wet kiss (all matters aside, this woman is my Grandmother). I quickly backed away, reminding Mrs. Knopp that this was to be a professional interview and that I did not have time to be wiping lipstick marks off of my cheeks. This was not the first time Jochevet had been interviewed about her brave youth spent as a soldier for the Haganah , the Israeli underground forces. In fact, just this past May she was presented with an award and was asked to make a speech discussing her experiences during the “War for Independence ” in Israel.external image _42078864_kidsschool.jpg-- Children celebrating Israeli Independence Day
“Did you know,” she began in her Israeli accent-captivating me with her confident stare, “Only 650,000 Jews lived in Israel in 1950, and now there are over four million!” I immediately recognized her fervor for the subject; she continued to tell me the about the situation in Palestine prior to her experiences, setting a well needed backdrop to a well deserving story. “When it came to the United Nations announcing the separation of Palestine between the Arabs and the Jews, I was already a fighter in the Underground. As soon as the decision was made, all seven neighboring Arab countries decided to attack the 650,000 Jews living in Palestine.” Jochevet spoke about the situation that took place in 1948 as if she had written the textbook on the war. She continued by making me understand that her army had tried to solve the problem diplomatically, offering to share the land with the Arabs, but that the Arabs “just didn’t want us there.”
The Haganah originated as a peaceful organization that worked to uncover a truce between the forever-warring sides. Jochevet, who joined the group as a youthful sixteen year old, never imagined how her decision would affect the rest of her life. After searching the ceiling for the proper date, she proceeded to tell me that in 1948, the Haganah joined with the Israeli army in an effort to take on the increasingly massive enemy. After asking her if she would have fled the army had she been given the chance, she strictly replied, “I joined the army of course because I was a member of the Haganah, there was no question, I had to fight. We all had to join the Israeli defense and we became one army.” Jochevet served in the army for two and a half years, usually stationed in the southern part of Israel. With a most proud expression on her face, she told me that she was discharged as a Second Lieutenant and then worked for the new Prime Minister of the newly founded State of Israel. She closed her history lecture by saying “now this is the basic facts, if you want more detail I can give it to you,” as if I was not ready for her amazing stories that were to come.
Using this information to direct the rest of my questions, I proceeded to ask Mrs. Knopp about any interesting experiences that stood out in her mind as she thought back to her days in the army. She immediately smiled, thinking back to one particular experience. "Once we started fighting, we had no ammunition.” Her story then began of a particularly more daring mission in which members of her sect of the Haganah had to board a Czech ship in the middle of the night and smuggle ammunition into the country. As she recalled the feel of the guns in her hand, she displayed a face of disgust. "I remember that the guns were full of grease and we had to clean them before we could bring them into the country and hide them." Before I could even ask a follow up question, she began telling another story that seemed to have just jumped into her mind. Mrs. Knopp and her section had received word that the Arabs were planning an ambush on a group of "young people that had decided to go out to the club on a Friday night." Jochevet, along with the rest of the female soldiers were to accompany the young people as dates so that they could carry a gun in their pocketbooks for protection. With her hands up, Jochevet declared "It was the only way to get into the club with protection. " The story continued and took an unexpected twist that brought wide smiles across both Jochevet’s face and mine. "I had a curfew and had gotten home too late. When I arrived at my house, my dad was standing outside. He didn't say a word to me but just motioned for me to go into the house." As she thought back to her father's reaction, she too motioned with her arms. "At this point, my parents did not know that I was a member of the Haganah because it was a secret secret organization. “That night, the teenaged Jochevet had no choice but to tell her father why she had missed curfew. "I told him that I was a member of the Haganah and was on a mission. He then told me that it was very foolish of me not to tell him because he too belonged to the Haganah." Taking a moment to understand the situation, the interview experienced its first silence. We then both looked at each other and laughter soon filled the void. "My parents did not even know that I was in the army until one day my picture was in the paper and all my mother's friends went to go show her.” I then of course asked how it was possible for her parents not to know where she was going all the time. Her answer was plain and simple, "You know how it is, young people, always find their way around things. I would tell them that I was sleeping at a friend’s sometimes." Before concluding the interview, Mrs. Knopp reflected on what she thinks of the experience as an adult. Sticking to her confident, almost intimidating answers, she explained that "It was a very exciting time and I would do it again if I was young at the moment and was approaching the same situation; I wouldn't change a bit.”

An Instruction Haganah video demonstrating how to properly disarm a gun.

external image 300px-Haganah.jpg-- Israeli Defense forces creating a formation during the War for Independence







1984 Lesson Plan 1 (Lock in Those Lyrics, Wayne Brady Style)

Full lesson plan may be found HERE!

Opening:

  • Listen to Pink Floyd's Another Brick In The Wall Part Two and analyze the lyrics
  • Identify any connections between Floyd's symbolic album and the underlying message of 1984

external image wall_wideweb__470x310,0.jpg--Pink Floyd's, Roger Waters spray-paints "No Thought Control" on the Berlin Wall.

Middle:

  • Check out this listof songs with lyrics dealing with the government
  • Now It's your turn! Go find a song together and create your own lyrics using the events of Book 1
    • Make sure you use at least two exact quotes from 1984! Good Luck!
  • You can use this site to find the song that you would like to work with
  • If there is time, put the song into garageband and record yourselves singing your new lyrics


1984 Lesson Plan 2 (Let's Get It On)

Full Lesson Plan HERE

Winston after spotting his lover for the first time
Winston after spotting his lover for the first time

Opening:

  • Book Two discusses the topic of sex in depth, during various sessions between our man Winston, and his new beauty Julia
  • Analyze the quote on page 125, " she had torn her clothes off, and when she flung them aside it was with that same magnificent gesture by which a whole civilization seemed to be annihilated"
  • Brainstorm a list of reasons why having sex is the ultimate act of rebellion in the 1984 Society

Middle:

  • Using the application, Comic Life,design your very own comic strip for the growing relationship between Winston and Julia
  • Include the happenings of their first meeting, and at least three actual quotes from the text in which either Winston or Julia discusses their hatred for the brotherhood
  • Once the comic strip has been created, share it with your partner and then together, predict the happenings of Book Three. Will Winston and Julia stay together? What will become of their involvement in "the brotherhood?"

Ending:

  • Present your finished project to me and discuss aloud, what you think will become of the rebellious relationship

Lesson Three (Captured)

Full Lesson Plan HERE

Opening:

  • Well, you finally finished 1984. What'd you think? For the opening of our lesson plan today, I want you to identify similarities and differences between the future George Orwell predicted for us, and reality. Was Orwell necessarily incorrect in his predictions? Write down your thoughts and share with a neighbor

Middle:

  • What do you think was going through Winston's mind when he was captured?
  • Your job is to write a monologue, describing what you feeling (Winston) as you are being taken to various holding cells
  • Include specific people you meet and reflect on actual events from the text.
  • In essence, you are turning the 3rd person narration into a 1st person monologue. What would this part of the book look like if it were written from Winston's perspective. Would the tone have changed to perhaps a more frustrated and suspenseful one?

Ending:

  • Record your monologue on garageband.
  • Switch computers with a partner and make a video which brings to life Winston's thoughts.
  • Sync the video with the garageband track and enjoy... Be Creative!

external image big-brother-poster.jpg


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Wish You Were Here - Pink Floyd